Certificate in Byzantine Music
The Certificate in Byzantine Music program equips students with a mastery of the skills required for chanting the sacred hymns of the Orthodox Church. The program provides thorough knowledge of the psaltic notational system, the theoretical framework of the modal system, the ability to sight-read musical scores at all levels of complexity and an extensive familiarity with the contents and usage of liturgical books and the rubrics of the Orthodox Church. Upon completion of its requirements, students will be able to perform all musical parts of the daily liturgical cycle and the sacraments of the Orthodox Church.

Archdiocesan School of Byzantine Music Byzantine Music Theory and Practice Guide
The book contains a brief introduction to the history of Byzantine music, 107 exercises with analysis of the various characters, a page devoted to the theory of each mode, and a CD containing around 120 mp3's covering all of the material found in the book. The book is full color, 80 pages of thick gloss paper with a plastic spiral binding. It is very easy to read and follows the traditional methodology used in most Byzantine music books accepted by the conservatory of Athens.

St. Anthony's Monastery's Divine Music Project
This Divine Music Project, from St. Anthony's monastery, contains more than 6000 pages of Byzantine music in Western and Byzantine notation in the style of chanting used on the Holy Mountain.

National Forum of Greek Orthodox Church Musicians
A wealth of resources for chanters and choirs is available at the official website of the National Forum of Greek Orthodox Church Musicians.

Frank Desby Byzantine Chant Training Manual
The 345 page manual and CD is a comprehensive guide that takes the learner through the basics of the notational, rhythmic, and interval signs of Post-Byzantine ecclesiastical music.

Byzantine Music Workshop of the Pittsburgh Metropolis
A systematic teaching of Byzantine music, typikology and the tradition of chant through the training of solo and choral performance. Dr. Nick Giannoukakis, Coordinator and Protopsaltis, Metropolis of Pittsburgh


"Rejoice in the Lord, O you righteous! Praise befits the upright. Praise the Lord with the lyre, make melody to him with the harp of ten strings! Sing to him a new song, play skilfully on the strings, with loud shouts." -Psalm 33:1-3