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REV. ANDREW DEMOTSES

The second Book of Samuel in the Old Testament tells us a great deal about the life of King David. One of the stories included describes the time the Philistine armies had established their camp between the army of David and the town of Bethlehem. As David looked at the enemy camp, he could see beyond it the stirring scenes of his boyhood. The sight of the town where he was born and grew up probably stirred fond memories of the innocence of his childhood.

David had been good in many ways, but his past was also marked by a number of serious sins. Like so many of us, he wished that he could go back and do some things over. Perhaps this longing was what led him to say, "Oh that someone would give me a drink from the well of Bethlehem." (2 Sam. 23:15). That water would be so sweet to his taste! When three of his loyal soldiers overheard him, they broke through enemy lines at the rish of their lives and brought him a pitcher of that water. But now the king, overcome with emotion, refused to drink the water and poured it out on a rock as an expression of his determination to devote the rest of his life to the service of God.

The fact is we cannot relive our past and change what has been done, so we should not waste time on cherished fantasies or vain regrets. It is because we cannot go back and do it over that Christ said, "Anyone who starts to plow and then keeps looking back is of no use for the kingdom of God." (Luke 9:62).

We need to remember, however, that it is well within our power to change the present and future course of our lives. In doing so, we also insure that in looking back, we will have no regrets over missed opportunities. In this regard, it might be helpful for us to remember a wonderful easter proverb which tells us that "yesterday is already a dream, and tomorrow is only a vision, but today, well lived, makes every yesterday a dream of happiness, and every tomorrow a vision of hope." It is what we do today that counts.

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