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These sermons have been shared by parish priests and deal with the topic of stewardship from various perspectives.

 

Orthodox Christian Wealth & Stewardship By Anonymous

In the Gospel we read that Jesus told a rich young man that though he has kept the commandments, the one thing he must do to inherit eternal life is to sell all that he owns, distribute the money to the poor, and then come, and follow Him.  Luke writes, “But when he heard this, he became sad; for he was very rich. Jesus looked at him and said, ‘How hard it is for those who have wealth to enter the kingdom of God! Indeed, it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for someone who is rich to enter the kingdom of God.’”  Read more…

Two Plates – Not One By Fr. Anthony Coniaris

Someone said one Sunday during the offering, "Here we go again! There's always a plate."

The person was right in one way and wrong in another. There is not one plate-but two! One plate is man's; the offering plate that is passed to us every Sunday. The other plate is God's. And that is the paten, the "diskos", the plate that carries the Precious Body of our Lord during the liturgy. Two plates --- not one! Read more… 

The Journey to Salvation is not a Cruise By Fr. Steve Dalber

If asked the question Why do you go to church? most Orthodox Christians would probably be seriously baffled. This isn’t a question that has been asked or pondered upon by most. The reason for this response -- or lack of response -- lies in the fact that most Orthodox Christians take their faith for granted. They rely on generations of being told to “believe and don’t question.” While grandparents deserve a great deal of credit for keeping children and grandchildren in the faith, to “believe and don’t question” is fundamentally not Orthodox thinking. Faith is not enough. As Disciples of Christ we are directed to a much higher calling. The Church was created by our Lord as a vessel of salvation. By accepting Christ we are brought into this vessel through baptism. We belong to the Church because we have chosen to be saved. We willingly accept the wonderful gift of eternal life. What has been forgotten though, is that this gift comes with responsibilities.  Read more…

Thanksgiving and Stewardship By Fr. Alexander G. Leondis

We are found in the season of Thanksgiving when we offer gratitude to God as a nation and as individuals for His blessing and love for us. Today, November 21st our Church celebrates a unique feast of gratitude, the Entry of the Theotokos to the Temple.  Read more… 

Stewardship:  No Magic Pills By Fr. Mark Sietsema

Traveling as I have so much over the last three months, and being one who sleeps poorly in hotel rooms, I have seen lately more than my share of television at what I call the “Magic Pill Hour.”  You might know yourself, those wee hours of the morning when you can flip channels and find infomercial after infomercial touting the miracle solution to every problem in our American life.  There is a magic pill to help you stop smoking, a magic pill to help you have clearer skin, and above all, there are magic pills to make you lose weight.  You don’t need prescription drugs, you don’t need will-power, you don’t need the slow, steady work of diet and exercise.  You only need three easy payments of $19.95 … if you call right now, operators are standing by.  Read more… 

Member of the Body By Anonymous

What is a “member” of the Church? Use of the term “Member” in this situation is not the same as being a member of a club or civic group or fraternal organization. The Church is the “Body of Christ” (1 Corinthians 12:12). Therefore, to be a member of the Church is to be a part of the living body of Christ.  Read more…

I am the Vine; You are the Branches By Fr. Anastasios Gounaris

Growing up in New Bedford, Massachusetts, I often saw my father pruning the weaker branches from his beloved grapevines in the back yard.  He did so patiently, methodically, constantly - so that the stronger branches that showed promise could flourish.  I was thoroughly convinced that there wasn't a branch, leaf or even tendril that he didn't know intimately.  He plucked off individual Japanese beetles and parasites that would suck the life from the vines and applied copper sulphate powder to ward off mildew and fungal infections.  He poured himself - mind, body and soul - into the task.  He loved those vines.  Read more… 

$tewardship or S+ewardship By Fr. Harry Pappas

Unfortunately, when most of us hear or read the word “Stewardship,” we instinctively think of it spelled as “$tewardship,” a code word for giving money to church. It may be politely asked for. It may be clothed in pious language. It may be linked to giving of time and talents. But, in the end, stewardship still means, for most of us: “I must give some of my money so that we can operate the church.”  Read more… 

“Freely You Have Received. Freely Give.”  (Matthew 10:8) By Fr. James Dokos

In worldly everyday conversations; we hear the familiar phrase…Nothing is free in life.  Now the reality…freedom of any kind is a gift that is presented with a cost of humanity, dignity and the sharing with others.  We need not receive a penny for a favor; but await a reward of gratitude and joyful heart of another human being.  Simply stated and to borrow a phrase…Ask not what your Lord can do for you.  Ask what you can do for your Lord and His people!  Read more…

Youth Sermon/Lesson

“Freely You Have Received. Freely Give.”  (Matthew 10:8)

This time of year we often hear people around the church talking about stewardship and we generally understand this to mean making our offering to help support the church.  There is a lot of talk about the treasures and talents we have received and the importance of giving back to God.  Read more…

An “Adequate Answer” By Fr. Anastasios Gounaris

A famous Jew, Albert Einstein, said:  "A person first starts to live when he can live outside himself, when he can have as much regard for his fellow man as he does himself. We are here to do good. It is the responsibility of every human being to aspire to do something worthwhile, to make this world a better place than the one he found. Life is a gift, and if we agree to accept it, we must contribute in return. When we fail to contribute, we fail to adequately answer (emph. added) why we are here."  Read more…